Monthly archive for August, 2016

Top 10 reasons to consider kick out investment plans

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As at the end of last week, the range for the closing levels of the FTSE 100 Index over the previous 52 weeks was between 5537.0 and 6941.2, a difference of 1404.2 points. So whilst the UK’s index of leading blue chip companies remains as volatile as ever, there is one type of investment plan that continues to be a popular choice with our investors. Kick out plans offer a defined return for a defined level of risk, which combined with the opportunity to mature early mean they can offer a compelling opportunity in a wide range of investment climates.

Whilst many investors find it harder to commit when markets are seemingly more unpredictable than normal, or as has happened over the last couple of month has been on a relatively steady upwards trajectory, kick out investments remain popular regardless of what is happening to the stock market. With this in mind, we give you our Top 10 reasons to consider a kick out investment plan.

1.  Defined return, defined risk

With kick out plans the potential returns on offer, as well as what needs to happen to provide these returns, is known up front before you commit your capital – a defined return for a defined level of risk. The investor therefore has the benefit of knowing at the outset the conditions that need to be met in order to provide the stated returns. This allows the investor to consider the potential upside in the context of the amount of risk they are taking, which can then be used to make an informed decision about whether to invest or not.

2.  Early maturity

These plans have a maximum fixed term which is normally six years, but the term ‘kick out’ refers to their ability to mature early depending on the movement of the underlying investment (for example, the FTSE 100 Index). The potential to mature early is usually every 12 months after the start of the plan, with the first opportunity normally occurring at the end of year one or year two. If early maturity does occur, investors receive an attractive level of growth along with a full return of their initial capital. This structure has proved popular in all types of market conditions.

3.  Potential for high returns

In addition to the opportunity for early maturity it is no doubt the potential for high growth returns that also contribute to the ongoing popularity of kick out plans. With most plans offering high single digit or even double digit returns for each year invested (not compounded), the opportunity can be a compelling one, especially since what has to happen to the stock market in order to provide these returns is known at the very outset.

4.  Investment returns even if the market stays relatively flat

Most plans offer the ability to kick out at the end of each year provided the level of the underlying investment at that time is higher than its level at the start of the plan. So if you’re not convinced the markets will rise in the future, and yet still wish to achieve investment level returns, this can be a compelling investment story and is perhaps why this type of investment has proved particularly popular while the FTSE remains at what are historically high levels.

Click here to compare kick out investment plans »

5.  Potential to beat the market

Should a kick out plan be designed to mature early provided the level of the FTSE 100 Index (or other underlying investment) at the end of each year is higher than its value at the start of the plan, then provided the Index has gone up, even if this is by a small amount, you will receive the headline return along with a full repayment of your initial capital. In the scenario where the stock market has only risen by a very small amount, then it is likely that this type of investment would have outperformed the market. This may appeal to those investors who are not confident the market will rise significantly in the coming years, which seems to be a more popular sentiment when markets are at historically high levels.

6.  FTSE linked

Many kick out investment plans are linked to the performance of the FTSE 100 Index, which is widely recognised as the proxy benchmark for most investment managers in the UK. Since the historical volatility of this Index is familiar to many investors, they are in a better position to consider the pros and cons of the plan within the context of the underlying investment and the associated risks involved.

7.  Investment returns even if the market falls slightly

There are also kick out plans that will provide competitive growth returns even if the underlying investment falls slightly, for example up to 10% or 20%. These so called ‘defensive’ kick out plans thereby cater for an even wider range of investor views in terms of what could happen to the stock market in the coming years – the current range of defensive plans offering the potential for high growth returns even if the FTSE falls up to 20%. Again, whilst the FTSE has remained at historically high levels, this has proved to be a popular feature.

Click here to compare defensive kick out investment plans »

8.  Some capital protection from a falling market

Your original capital is returned if the plan kicks out but should this fail to occur, and no growth is achieved, typically your capital will be returned provided the underlying investment has not fallen below a certain amount. This amount is normally a percentage of its value at the start of the plan, usually in the region of 40% or 50%. To put this into context, for a plan which offers a return of capital unless the FTSE falls by more than 50%, then based on last Friday’s closing value of 6838.10, the Index would have to fall to a closing level of 3419.05 before your capital would be at risk, a level not seen since early 2003. However, if it does fall below 50% you could lose some or all of your initial capital. Please also remember that past performance is not a guide to future performance.

9.  No annual management charges

Unlike investment funds, the charges for creating and managing kick out plans are already taken into account so there are no annual management charges which come out of the headline return. The costs associated with the management of funds happens each and every year (in both actively managed and tracker funds), which may help to explain the number of funds which fail to outperform the FTSE 100 Index or other benchmark, especially over a five or six year period. This ongoing cost is not a feature of kick out plans. Most kick out investments will though have an initial charge, normally up to a maximum of 3%.

10. A disciplined approach

Finally, the mechanics of these investments removes the need for the investor to worry about when to come out of the market since the decision is made for them by the pre-determined market conditions required for the plan to mature or it simply comes to the end of the plan term. Should the plan mature, the investor then has the opportunity to reassess their options based on the market conditions at that time.

ISA friendly

All of the kick out plans offered through Fair Investment Company are available to individuals as a New ISA up to the current limit of £15,240 (2016/17 tax year) and will also accept transfers from both Cash ISAs and Stocks & Shares ISAs (as well as non-ISA investments). Since these investments are normally offered for a limited period, always note any New ISA or ISA transfer application deadlines.

Understand counterparty risk

One of the main differences with structured investment plans when compared with other types of investments, such as funds or investment trusts, is that your capital is used to purchase securities and it is these securities which are designed to produce the stated returns on offer. These securities are normally issued by a bank which means that your investment is held with a single institution rather than split between a number of companies, as it would be within an investment fund. This means the risk of the bank becoming insolvent and therefore unable to repay your original investment along with any stated returns becomes a factor to consider – this is known as counterparty risk. Since the counterparty is usually a bank, the credit rating is normally available so a view can be taken on the potential risk involved. There are also plans which aim to reduce this counterparty risk by spreading it across a number of institutions.

Latest selections

Kick out investment plans offer the potential for high returns balanced with conditional capital protection, with our latest selections offering a wide range of counterparties, collateralised versions as well as ‘defensive’ plans giving investors plenty of choice. We also have a number of kick out investments for our existing customers and those more experienced investors where you will find a range of dual Index plans which offer a higher risk versus reward, with current headline returns of up to 14% after 12 months.

 

Click here for our latest kick out investment plans »

Click here for our latest defensive kick out investments »

Click here for our experienced investor section »

 

No news, feature article or comment should be seen as a personal recommendation to invest. Prior to making any decision to invest, you should ensure that you are familiar with the risks associated with a particular investment. If you are at all unsure of the suitability of a particular investment, both in respect of its objectives and its risk profile, you should seek independent financial advice.

Tax treatment of ISAs depends on your individual circumstances and is based on current law which may be subject to change in the future. Always remember to check whether any charges apply before transferring an ISA.

Kick out investment plans are structured investment plans that are not capital protected and are not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) for default alone. There is a risk of losing some or all of your initial investment. There is a risk that the company backing the plan or any company associated with the plan may be unable to repay your initial investment and any returns stated. In addition, you may not get back the full amount of your initial investment if the plan is not held for the full term. The past performance of the FTSE 100 Index is not a guide to its future performance.

Summer sizzlers: our selection of the hottest deals on offer this summer

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Last updated: 12/09/2016

As the Olympic Games continue to keep us gripped with excitement, it’s not just the GB Team that’s sizzling this summer. The news that the Bank of England base rate has fallen to a new record low has meant the need for both savers and investors to review their options has really heated up. So to help you stay on top of all the action, we bring you a selection of the hottest savings and investment deals on offer this summer.

Interest rates

Since the recent reduction to a new record low for the Bank of England’s base rate, savings rates have started to fall at a significant pace. Needless to say the outlook for savers is not good, but it’s not just savings rates that are falling. Bond yields also face record lows whilst the share prices of many of the higher yielding FTSE 100 companies have gone up as more investors search for income. So the outlook is bleak for both savers and investors, and the need to make the most out of your capital has suddenly become priority number one this summer.

So what’s hot?

For many savers, longer term savings rates are not offering enough of an increased rate to justify tying your money up for longer, and so we see most activity is in the short term space, from instant access up to 2 years. Whilst as you might expect, with interest rates coming down, many savers inevitably start to consider taking on more risk with their capital in the hunt for higher returns, so we also cover some of our income and growth investment best sellers.

Combining every day banking with up to 5.0% interest

The fact remains that loyal bank customers are rarely rewarded and so usually face far lower rates on their savings compared to those who shop around. Well this is now also true of current accounts. Although historically these accounts have been renowned for offering very low rates of interest, this has started to change significantly in the last few years with some offering very competitive returns indeed.

Low monthly balance top pick – Nationwide’s FlexDirect account pays 5.0% AER fixed for the first 12 months on all in credit balances up to £2,500. Thereafter the rate reverts to 1.0% AER variable.

Higher monthly balance top pick – Santander’s 1|2|3 account pays 3.0% AER variable on your entire balance up to £20,000 provided your balance is at least £3,000. This rate is set to change to 1.50% AER on all balances up to £20,000 from 1st November 2016. It also offers some competitive cashback rates on a wide selection of household bills. A £5 per month account fee applies.

Instant access – market leading 1.20% AER variable

When longer terms savings rates are low, instant access accounts see far greater inflows as savers use this as a safety net whilst reviewing other options. The Freedom Access Account from RCI Bank is a market leading instant access account paying 1.20% AER variable and you can save from £100 up to £1m, with free and unlimited payments and withdrawals. RCI Bank is part of the Renault global banking group and so the first €100,000 equivalent is protected by the French deposit guarantee scheme (FGDR) rather than the UK FSCS.

For those where the UK FSCS is more of a priority, Aldermore’s Easy Access Account offers 1.00% AER variable on balances from £1,000 to £1m, whilst the B account is an innovative new banking service from Clydesdale and Yorkshire Banks which combines a current account with an instant access account, the latter offering 1% AER variable on all balances. The interest rates alone are worth a closer look but this account might particularly appeal to the more technically savvy saver due to the intuitive B banking app which forms part of the overall proposition.

Fixed rate bonds – short terms hit the top spots

Whilst instant access offers 1.20%, a top deal on a 5 year fixed rate is only offering 1.0% per year more at 2.20% AER. These are without doubt some of the lowest long term fixed rates in history and this 1% margin has resulted in more money staying in shorter term fixed rates. Here are our current top picks for those who can tie their money up for between 6 months and 3 years, all of which are eligible for the UK’s FSCS:

6 months top pick: Habib Bank 6 month Fixed Rate Deposit, offering 0.80% AER

1 year top pick: Bank of Cyprus 1 Year Fixed Rate Bond, paying 1.30% AER

2 year top pick: Bank of Cyprus 2 Year Fixed Rate Bond, paying 1.40%

3 year top pick: Bank of Cyprus 3 Year Fixed Rate Bond, paying 1.50%

The minimum deposit with Bank of Cyprus accounts is £10,000 whilst for Habib Bank it is £1,000. For those looking for a 1, 2 or 3 year fixed rate account with a lower minimum, Aldermore Bank pays 1.40% AER over 3years, 1.30% AER over 2 years and 1.20% AER fixed for one year, all with a minimum of £1,000.

Long term savings alternative – potential 24% growth return

For those looking for the potential for higher growth and are prepared to tie their money up for the longer term, the Investec 6 Year Defensive Deposit Plan offers an alternative that some savers might find attractive. By linking your return to the FTSE 100 Index, this deposit plan offers the potential for a 24% fixed return, which is paid provided the value of the Index at the end of the plan, is higher than 95% of its value at the start of the plan (subject to averaging). So the FTSE can fall up to 5% and you still receive the fixed return. However, if the Index is lower, you will only receive a return of your original capital.

The best long term fixed rate savings bonds are paying around 2.20% AER whilst by linking your deposit to the FTSE, if this Deposit Plan pays out the 24% return is equivalent to 3.65% AER. With record low longer term fixed rates forcing some savers to consider a wider range of options, the combination of capital protection plus the potential for a high growth return could be a compelling opportunity. Taxpayers can also benefit from tax free growth as the plan is also available as an ISA.

Fixed income investment

Another consequence of this sustained period of low longer term fixed rates is that savers start to consider taking on more risk with their capital in the hunt for higher returns. One such plan that has been popular in this area is the Enhanced Income Plan from Investec Bank. Unusually for an investment, it has a fixed term and offers a fixed income each year, paid to you regardless of the performance of the stock market. It also pays income each month which is the most popular payment frequency. The latest issue pays 4.92% per year, paid as 0.41% each month.

Also unusual for an investment is the inclusion of some capital protection, or ‘conditional capital protection’. This means that your initial capital is returned at the end of the investment unless the FTSE falls by more than 50% during the fixed term of the plan. If it does, and the Index also finishes below its starting level then your original capital will be reduced by 1% for each 1% fall, so you could lose some or all of your original investment.

Up to 6.0% investment income, quarterly payments

The Focus FTSE Quarterly Contingent Income Plan offers up to 6% per year which is higher than the income on the Investec plan however it is not fixed, but rather dependent on the performance of the FTSE 100 Index. A quarterly payment of 1.50% is made provided the value of the Index at the end of each quarter is at or above 75% of its value at the start of the investment. If the Index is below 75% of its opening level, no income payment will be made for that quarter.

Your initial investment is returned in full unless the FTSE has fallen by more than 40%, measured at the end of the fixed term only. If it has fallen below this level, capital will be reduced by 1% for each 1% fall and so you could lose some or all of your initial investment.

Both of these plans are available as an ISA and accept ISA transfers, in which case your income would be tax free.

Defensive growth plans

Finally, in the investment growth space, defensive plans have been popular on the back of the UK’s decision to leave the UK and the uncertainty around what impact this might have on our growth and economic prospects. These defensive plans offer the potential for investment level returns even if the stock market goes down, in some case by up to 50%. They are therefore proving popular with investors concerned about the historically high level of the FTSE and would therefore like to include a defensive element to their investment. This plan may appeal to those who think the FTSE might fall slightly, stay the same, or rise in the coming years but not significantly.

Defensive Kick Out top pick: Investec’s FTSE 100 Step Down Kick-Out Plan offers the opportunity for 8.0% for each year invested (not compounded) even if the FTSE falls up to 20% over the term of the plan. Capital is at risk is the FTSE falls by more than 50%.

Fixed term defensive growth top pick: Investec’s FTSE 100 Defensive Growth Plan offers a 33% fixed return at the end of the plan, provided the Index it at least half its value at the start of the plan (i.e. it can fall up to 50% and you still receive the 33%, along with a full return of capital). Your capital is at risk if the FTSE has fallen by more than 50%, in which case you could lose some or all of your initial investment.

 

Compare our Top 3 current accounts »

Compare instant access accounts »

Compare fixed rate bonds »

Compare income investments »

Compare growth and defensive growth investments »

 

AER stands for the Annual Equivalent Rate and illustrates what the interest rate would be if interest was paid and compounded once each year. Gross is the interest you will receive before tax is deducted.

No news, feature article or comment should be seen as a personal recommendation to invest. Prior to making any decision to invest, you should ensure that you are familiar with the risks associated with a particular plan. If you are at all unsure of the suitability of a particular product, both in respect of its objectives and its risk profile, you should seek professional advice.

Tax treatment of ISAs depends on your individual circumstances and is based on current law which may be subject to change in the future. Always remember to check whether any charges apply before transferring an ISA.

The investments in this article are structured investment plans that are not capital protected and are not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) for default alone. There is a risk of losing some or all of your initial investment due to the performance of the FTSE 100 Index or shares listed within the Index. As share prices can move by a wide margin, plans based on the performance of shares represent higher risk investments than plans based on the FTSE 100 Index as a whole.

There is also a risk that the company backing the plan or any company associated with the plan may be unable to repay your initial investment and any returns stated. In addition, you may not get back the full amount of your initial investment if the plan is not held for the full term. The past performance of the FTSE 100 Index or shares listed within the Index is not a guide to their future performance.

Fixed returns – our round up of the latest fixed rate options

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Last updated: 30/08/2016

For those who want to know exactly how much they will receive, when and for how long, the traditional deposit-based fixed rate bond has long been one of the safest and most popular choices for many. But with interest rates on savings remaining at record lows, and with the possibility of this getting even or fixed worse as we get to grips with the post-Brexit environment, many more are starting to consider the wider range of products offering a fixed return. So whether it is the more traditional fixed rate bond rate Cash ISA, or you are looking to put your capital at risk in return for a higher fixed income, we take a look at a number of options as well as give you a round-up of the latest offerings.

Short term: up to 2 years

Fixed rate bonds

For those looking at the shortest fixed terms, Habib Bank Zurich offer a 6 Month Fixed Rate Deposit paying 0.80% AER, whilst they also offer a higher rate of 1.10% AER if you can tie your money up for a year, with their 12 Month Fixed Rate Deposit. Both products have a relatively low minimum of £1,000 and your deposit is eligible for the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). Interest is paid at maturity and as is standard with most fixed term deposits, no withdrawals are permitted during the term of the bond.

Bank of Cyprus UK offer a top rate of 1.40% AER if you fix for 2 years, although they have a slightly higher minimum of £10,000 whereas Habib Bank will offer 1.35% AER with their 24 Month Fixed Rate Deposit but with a lower minimum of £1,000. Both pay interest at maturity and eligible deposits are covered by the UK FSCS.

Fixed rate Cash ISA

Bank of Cyprus UK offer a 2 Year Fixed Rate Cash ISA paying 1.20% AER, and only marginally higher at 1.30% AER if your fix for 3 years, both with a low minimum deposit of just £500. These accounts are available to anyone aged 16 or over and interest is paid annually. ISA transfers are permitted and eligible deposits are covered by the UK FSCS.

Medium term: 3 to 4 years

Fixed rate bonds

In the three to four year space, our top deal comes again from Bank of Cyprus UK with their 3 Year Fixed Rate paying 1.50% AER. The minimum deposit is £10,000 and interest is paid on maturity. For those looking for a lower minimum or more frequent payment of interest, AXIS Bank UK’s 3 Year Fixed Term Deposit also pays 1.50% AER but with a £1,000 minimum (£200,000 maximum) and offers monthly, quarterly, annually or at maturity interest options. No withdrawals are permitted from either account.

Fixed rate Cash ISA

Bank of Cyprus remain very competitive in the fixed rate Cash ISA market with their 3 Year Fixed Rate Cash ISA currently paying 1.30% AER and with a respectable minimum deposit of just £500. This account also allows you to transfer in existing ISAs from other providers.

Longer term: 5 years +

Fixed rate bonds

Although you are still rewarded with higher savings rates in return for locking your money away for longer, the interest rate gap between short term and longer term is also at record lows. For those prepared to commit their savings for five years, Vanquis Bank’s 5 Year Fixed Rate Bond is paying 2.20% AER. The minimum deposit is £1,000 and interest can be paid monthly or annually.

Savings rates at record lows…

Unfortunately the UK’s decision to leave the EU has had an impact on what were already record low interest rates on offer. Combined with the talk of the Bank of England potentially cutting the Bank Rate for the first time since 2009, and the outlook for many who rely on more traditional fixed term deposits is bleak to say the least.

To put this into context, 12 months ago we wrote about a 1 year fixed rate paying 1.90% AER, a 2 year paying 2.38% AER and a 3 year paying 2.50% AER . We are now looking at 1.25%, 1.60% and 1.65% AERs respectively. These are significant reductions of up to 34% on what were already historically low returns, with the biggest falls being felt at the longer term end of the market. This is why more and more are looking at a wider range of options, which inevitably leads one to consider investments.

Fixed income investments

The income from collective investments (such as funds) invariably comes from investing in a number of equities, bonds and commercial properties, which provide income in the form of dividends, interest and rental yields. Combined with the fluctuation in value of the underlying asset, be this a share, bond or property, then by its very nature the value is neither fixed nor guaranteed, and so such investments normally only offer a variable income.

Fixed income, fixed term

Investors have therefore always struggled to find an investment that actually pays a fixed income, which perhaps partly helps to explain why the Enhanced Income Plan from Investec has been our most popular income investment. The plan offers a fixed income, which is paid to you regardless of the performance of the stock market, whilst the investment also has a fixed term, so you know exactly how much you will be paid and for how long. The current issue offers 5.04% fixed income each year, which is paid as 0.42% each month.

This investment includes conditional capital protection which means that your initial capital is retuned in full unless the FTSE 100 Index falls by more than 50% during the plan term. If it does, and also finishes the fixed term lower than its value at the start of the plan, your initial investment will be reduced by 1% for every 1% fall, so you could lose some or all of your initial investment.

The Enhanced Income Plan is also available as an ISA and accepts ISA transfers with a minimum investment of £3,000.

Cash versus investment

The most important difference between the fixed rate bond and the fixed income investment is that with the former, your capital is treated as a deposit and is therefore protected and returned to you at the end of the term, subject to the bank in question remaining solvent. An investment into the Enhanced Income Plan is used to purchase securities issued by Investec Bank plc, which means the bank’s ability to meet and repay their financial obligations is equally an important consideration. However, as highlighted above the return of your capital is also dependent on the performance of the FTSE 100 Index, therefore your capital is not protected and is at risk.

Peer to Peer

One particular area where we have seen a significant rise in the number of the offerings is Peer to Peer lending, some of which offer fixed rates of interest. In simple terms, peer to peer lenders match people who want to earn interest on their money with people who want to borrow money. This means that both lenders and borrowers can benefit from interest rates that are better than those found on the high street, whether from conventional fixed rate accounts or from bank loans.

Fixed interest

One of the earliest and perhaps best known Peer to Peer lenders offering fixed interest is Wellesley & Co. Here your investment is combined with funds from other investors and then lent out to individuals and businesses investing in property – so every loan is secured against tangible assets such as residential or commercial property. They then use the interest paid by them to pay competitive rates to investors. Wellesley have lent out over £336m to date.

The current rates (based on receiving monthly interest) are 2.95%, 3.30% and 3.70% over 1, 2 and 3 years respectively. You also have the option to receive interest at maturity, offering up to 3.75% annual interest. Compared to deposit-based fixed rate bonds these headline rates are attractive however these are capital at risk investments, and so you could lose some or all of your initial investment and interest payments are no guaranteed if the borrower fails to repay the loan. Peer to Peer lending is also not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.

Risk v reward

The principle of risk versus reward means that the search for higher fixed returns leads to the need to consider putting your capital at risk. A good benchmark for assessing your fixed rate investment is to compare what you could get from a fixed rate deposit over a similar timeframe and then consider whether you are prepared to accept the level of risk to your capital in return for the higher fixed rate.

Our best three and five year fixed rates are currently offering 1.85% and 2.20% respectively. By accepting risk to your capital, Wellesley would offer fixed interest of 3.70% over three years whilst the Investec plan offers 5.04% over six years, thereby doubling your fixed return over three year and increasing it by 2.84% a year over the longer term. Once you have understood how each plan works, the decision then is whether you are comfortable with putting your capital at risk in return for the higher fixed returns on offer.

 

Compare fixed rate bonds »

Compare fixed rate Cash ISAs »

Compare Peer to Peer investments »

Find out more about the Investec Enhanced Income Plan »

 

No news, feature article or comment should be seen as a personal recommendation to invest. Prior to making any decision to invest, you should ensure that you are familiar with the risks associated with a particular investment. If you are at all unsure of the suitability of a particular investment, both in respect of its objectives and its risk profile, you should seek independent financial advice.

Tax treatment of ISAs depends on your individual circumstances and is based on current law which may be subject to change in the future. Always remember to check whether any charges apply before transferring an ISA.

The Investec Enhanced Income Plan is a structured investment plan which is not capital protected and is not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) for default alone. There is a risk of losing some or all of your initial investment. There is a risk that the company backing the plan or any company associated with the plan may be unable to repay your initial investment and any returns stated. In addition, you may not get back the full amount of your initial investment if the plan is not held for the full term. The past performance of the FTSE 100 Index or any shares listed within the Index is not a guide to their future performance.

Peer to peer savings accounts are not the same as normal savings accounts so you need to consider the features before you invest. Investment through Wellesley & Co involves lending to individuals or companies and therefore your capital is at risk and interest payments are not guaranteed if the borrower fails to repay the loan. In that event, Wellesley Finance would attempt to recover the funds outstanding. However, such security arrangements do not guarantee full return of capital and income. Peer-to-Peer lending is not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.

AER stands for the Annual Equivalent Rate and illustrates what the interest rate would be if interest was paid and compounded once each year.